Homeschool: Teaching Older Children About Business

One of the mental challenges of homeschooling is the process of taking complete and total ownership of your child’s education. It can be quite a burden to break out of the molds that society would label “education”. The beauty of homeschooling is that you as the parent/educator is that you can weave your child’s passions, interests, and abilities into the subjects you bring to the table.

  • Why wouldn’t I take the time to teach my children something they want to learn, something they see value in, and sneak in a few “educational lessons” along the way.

I currently am teaching 3 of my children how to build an online business. I have their complete and total attention because they are very motivated by the fact that they believe they have something to offer people online. The bonus is that because they believe they can make a few dollars, I have their undivided attention.

  • The same way that we might puree carrots and squash to add to a sauce and sneak in nutrition, I sneak my core goals into everything I teach my kids as we research and pursue their passions.

As I teach the process of brainstorming and running toward an online business, I am able to teach many “academic” subjects, masquerading in the interests of my kids.

  • Math is easy to sneak in. For business, they need to know and practice statistics, math, and accounting.
  • Language is covered in every part of these projects in the form of content, marketing, and research.

I have spent quite a bit of time thinking about how to better prepare my young men for this new and crazy world. My oldest son is a sophomore in college and we are constantly discussing his future, his career choices and the fact that what he does today profoundly impacts his tomorrow. He is well on his way to earning his degree and reaching his lifelong dream of being a history professor, but he has dreams or being a business owner.

So why build an online business with him?

  • Because I can.
  • Because I am learning the processes myself and am very excited about my own progress.
  • My enthusiasm is contagious.

I believe this is the perfect time in history to teach our children more than their ABC’s and 1,2,3’s. Technology was basically birthed into these young sponges. They are bored with traditional educational processes, because everything they need to know is at the tips of their fingers or on their smart devices.

Find what your children are passionate about and wrap their education like a learning burrito.

Ask your kids if they are interested in learning something like building an online business. If you do not know how, learn the process together.

Tips for Teaching Young Children

How do we teach in a way that hooks into a child’s natural desire to learn?

Children are naturally curious. They explore, experiment, touch, ask questions, and are motivated to learn. To them it’s all play, and they don’t need adults praising them for their efforts.

Wondering how you can help children succeed? Consider the following characteristics of how they learn to help you teach in ways that improve their ability to make sense of new concepts.

1. Young children learn when subject areas are integrated

Offer children thematic units rich with content and they will be interested and motivated, especially if you can bring real things to touch and explore that relate to the theme.

Basic literacy and math concepts can be taught and reviewed as the theme content is shared. A “winter” theme offers many opportunities to teach the letter W, to count and record the number of mittens on snowmen constructed in an art lesson, or to create patterns for paper scarfs.

A child learning about the life cycle of a butterfly may act it out with creative movement and poetry, paint the process with a large paper and paint, illustrate and label the stages in science and literacy lessons and listen to related stories and songs. Avoid pursuing a theme if the children have lost interest. Ask yourself if you are presenting enough “real objects”. New themes get everyone motivated and enthusiastic.

2. Children learn in lots of different ways

Visual learners watch closely when you demonstrate an activity and like to draw and play with shapes and puzzles. Auditory learners understand ideas and concepts because they remember information they have heard, follow spoken directions well and remember songs easily.

Although all children learn through touch, some learn best combining touch and movement (tactile/kinetic learners). Some children like structure while others learn more easily in an unstructured environment.

If you want busy, happy and on task children, give them a variety of lessons that meet the needs of different learning styles.

3. Children often do not have the vocabulary to express themselves

Inexperienced teachers sometimes misinterpret a child’s unwillingness to participate as stubbornness or bad behavior when in reality, the child may lack the skills to explain himself. Use reflective listening to help children communicate why they are upset.

Sometimes children work well in groups, learning to share and develop ideas. At other times they just need to be alone with ample time to figure things out for themselves.

Do not expect perfection. Relax and have fun with your students!

4. Children progress when concepts are taught in a structured, step-by-step way

When concepts are presented in a structured step-by-step process with each step building on previous knowledge, children learn with less effort.

For example, expecting a young child to understand the concept of a food chain without previous experiences with, and vocabulary about, chains and links is assuming too much.

5. Children’s abilities to observe and process information develop at varying rates

Some four-year old children have superb small motor coordination and draw and cut beautifully, but have delayed speech patterns. Other children may be verbally eloquent but be physically uncoordinated or be at a scribbling stage in drawing.

Just as children develop physically at different rates, they also progress academically, socially, emotionally, and artistically at varying speeds. Effective teaching happens when teachers remember that learning is developmental.

Offer open-ended activities to meet the developmental stages of all students. An open-ended activity involves children at a wide range of developmental levels. Children are less frustrated working at their own level and they do not have to compare their results to a set of identical worksheets.

6. Children learn best when given things, objects, and stuff to explore

When teaching young children, always use concrete materials, as children need sensory experiences when learning new ideas and concepts.

Take advantage of the many educational learning materials available to teach geometry, number sense, pattern skills, symmetry, classification and other math concepts.

Use science materials like magnets, light paddles, scales, weights, and collections of birds’ nests, as well as book character toys and puppets to enhance literacy.

7. Children need instruction, practice and time to learn new skills and concepts

A child doesn’t learn to ride a bike by only looking at the bike and exploring its properties, he/she also needs time to practice and guided instruction.

Practicing concepts and skills does not need to be dull and repetitive. Do not automatically think “worksheet” when you think of skills practice. There are lots of ways to practice skills using puzzles, games, diagrams, art and more.

8. Children won’t learn if they are over tired, hungry, upset or worried

Be flexible and understanding with young children. Check to see if kids are hungry. It’s easier to let a child eat part of her lunch early, than attempt to make a hungry child concentrate on a task.

Sometimes a child needs to be left alone and creating a small retreat space in the classroom can help students who are too overwhelmed by home or other circumstances to cope with their peers or teacher.

9. Motivated children pay attention

Young children are generally motivated to learn about everything. Unless they have often been made fun of when investigating or presenting their knowledge, they have a strong desire to find out and share information.

Reinforce thinking processes rather than praising the child. Saying “That’s an interesting way you sorted your blocks. Tell me what you were thinking” rather than, “Samuel is so smart” will focus the children’s attention on exploring the blocks. Making too much fuss of any one child can result in a competitive atmosphere.

10. Children learn by teaching others

When children have an opportunity to communicate their new knowledge to adults or other children it helps solidify concepts. Some children need extra time to find the correct words to explain what they are thinking so patience is necessary.

To help children share their knowledge, use descriptive words as they play or work and they will copy your vocabulary.

11. Children Need to be Active

If children have been sitting still too long, they will let you know it’s time to move. Even the best, well planned, interesting lessons fail if the children need a break.

Take plenty of movement breaks, go for walks around the school, march around the classroom or jump up and down! You will have more alert and focused students.

Summary

As children experience your love and acceptance and realize that you are willing to help them, they relax and learn. Keep a sense of enthusiasm, wonder and curiosity about the world around you, and your students will imitate your behavior. Your classroom may be one of the few places where their opinions and ideas are valued.

The Impacts Of Home School Education To Children

Home education is simply conducting learning discussion at home. The parent or tutor is the teacher while the children are students. Studies found out that there were about 2 million home schooled students in America and the number increased up to 5 – 12% over the previous decade.

Long before the constructions of academic institutions such as universities and colleges, home school education has long been practiced at home. As the old adage goes, "the home is the first school of children while their parents are their first teacher" holds so much truth. Unless parents are teachers, education at home provides alternative venue and option to teach children basic lessons such as colors, shapes, and basic math and science as well formative values.

Probably the best thing about this approach is that the parent and child are able to spend more time together. This will deepen their bond or relationship and will provide opportunity to exchange familiarization of their own personalities. This way of teaching makes it possible to customize the time and be flexible about. Parents are able to choose the discussions to suit their children's habit, preferences and ability. They are also able to monitor their children and work with them closely. The following are found to benefit and create impact on home schooled children and parents as well:

1. Individualized Attention – the most effective benefit of home schooling is that child enjoy the privilege of having a "teacher" closely and solely focusing on the child's progress

2. Freedom to Diversify – Parents are also able to customize the curriculum and make sure it fits the needs of the child. Parents should take note that Home school education still follows particular federal policies and laws.

3. Social Adjustment – Children find extra-curricular activities exciting and fun. Incorporating field trip with cousins ​​of same age, or trip to museums with a kid next door is a fun way to learn. It will also help children overcome lack of social interaction as critics say of this method of teaching.

4. Family Bonding – bringing the parent and children closer

5. A Good Education – having to create a venue to foster holistic development of the child

When considering this approach to your children, it helps that the entire family is involved in the decision – making process as well the discussions, activities and other home school components (such as field trips, trip to museum, zoos and playgrounds) as well. Also, assessing your financial capacity will help your visualize the amount you are willing to shell out for home school education. If financial sources are uncertain, be resourceful and look for alternative materials to suffice the needs. Families who have tried home schooling have good lessons and experiences to share. So talking to these families will help you visualize what you are putting yourself into.

Either way, the parent must be sensitive and conscious to children's needs and wants. Although it has been proven that this type of methodology is beneficial to children, the parent must always assess the development of the child to make sure that the home school education fits their children.