Homeschool: Teaching Older Children About Business

One of the mental challenges of homeschooling is the process of taking complete and total ownership of your child’s education. It can be quite a burden to break out of the molds that society would label “education”. The beauty of homeschooling is that you as the parent/educator is that you can weave your child’s passions, interests, and abilities into the subjects you bring to the table.

  • Why wouldn’t I take the time to teach my children something they want to learn, something they see value in, and sneak in a few “educational lessons” along the way.

I currently am teaching 3 of my children how to build an online business. I have their complete and total attention because they are very motivated by the fact that they believe they have something to offer people online. The bonus is that because they believe they can make a few dollars, I have their undivided attention.

  • The same way that we might puree carrots and squash to add to a sauce and sneak in nutrition, I sneak my core goals into everything I teach my kids as we research and pursue their passions.

As I teach the process of brainstorming and running toward an online business, I am able to teach many “academic” subjects, masquerading in the interests of my kids.

  • Math is easy to sneak in. For business, they need to know and practice statistics, math, and accounting.
  • Language is covered in every part of these projects in the form of content, marketing, and research.

I have spent quite a bit of time thinking about how to better prepare my young men for this new and crazy world. My oldest son is a sophomore in college and we are constantly discussing his future, his career choices and the fact that what he does today profoundly impacts his tomorrow. He is well on his way to earning his degree and reaching his lifelong dream of being a history professor, but he has dreams or being a business owner.

So why build an online business with him?

  • Because I can.
  • Because I am learning the processes myself and am very excited about my own progress.
  • My enthusiasm is contagious.

I believe this is the perfect time in history to teach our children more than their ABC’s and 1,2,3’s. Technology was basically birthed into these young sponges. They are bored with traditional educational processes, because everything they need to know is at the tips of their fingers or on their smart devices.

Find what your children are passionate about and wrap their education like a learning burrito.

Ask your kids if they are interested in learning something like building an online business. If you do not know how, learn the process together.

The Successful Homeschool Family Handbook – A Must For Homeschoolers

Parents deciding to homeschool their children often experience some anxiety about making this important decision. This is quite understandable, considering homeschooling is life-changing–for parents and children alike.

If you have thought about homeschooling without making a commitment yet, or if you are already homeschooling with a desire for greater excellence in your children’s education, Dorothy and Raymond Moore’s book, The Successful Homeschool Family Handbook: A creative and stress-free approach to homeschooling may be the resource you need.

I offer this brief review of a book that offers extensive advice with foundational research to parents who are already homeschooling, and those who are considering homeschooling. The information contained within this volume offers sage wisdom lighting the path to successful homeschooling for all families.

Success or stress?

Moore and Moore start off their book by addressing the issue of stress in schooling at home. The truth is, teaching a child at any age or grade level is incredibly challenging. This is even truer when your own child becomes your student, and you their teacher.

Although the public school system may not be ideal for your family, you must give much consideration to the reality that you will become a teacher. Just as certified teachers holding a college degree are required to constantly update their skills and qualifications to teach students in the public sector, it is as equally (if not more) important that you do the same.

Reducing and eliminating stress.

Homeschooling can absolutely be a success in your family. However, it can create a tremendous load of stress, too. It is important to be aware of this and be prepared to deal with it productively.

To maintain a healthy homeschool, there are a myriad of aspects, some of which have a tendency to be overlooked by homeschooling parents. This oversight or avoidance leads to stress. A few areas Moore and Moore discuss include (along with many others) standardized testing, socializing your children, and organization.

Tried and true.

Moore and Moore conclude their research and insight with two final parts in their book that provide encouragement and advice from fellow homeschooling families. These two sections offer wisdom from parents who have “been there, done that” in the world of homeschooling. These personal stories show just how successful and rewarding homeschooling can be for any family. Finally, the Moores close with their own offering of knowledge to help encourage parents, as well as additional information on the history of learning at home.

8 Simple Tips For Selecting The Best Homeschool Writing Curriculum

When I was an English teacher, curriculum planning was a breeze. The curriculum committee at the school district decided what learning materials were appropriate for the students in my classroom. At the beginning of the semester, everything I needed was delivered to me in a large, heavy box.

With the help of the dense-packed teacher’s manual and numerous ancillary materials, I was able to create daily lesson plans with little difficulty. But for most homeschool parents, the curriculum planning process is seldom so straightforward.

Because writing is a foundational academic skill, many homeschool parents place special emphasis on selecting an appropriate homeschool writing curriculum for their children. But with so many options, finding the best homeschool writing curriculum can seem like a formidable task.

As a foster parent, I’ve investigated a variety of homeschool writing curriculum options for the child currently in my care. Here are some guidelines to make the decision-making process a little easier for you and your family:

1. Build your homeschool writing curriculum from any item or opportunity to help you teach writing. This includes activities as simple as writing poems or song lyrics. Young children especially are natural poets. Inspiration to write poetry can be found anywhere. Reading some children’s poetry books can help stimulate the creative process.

2. Since writing is a fundamental skill, buy your homeschool writing curriculum first. To keep from being overwhelmed by all of the options in the marketplace, read reviews online and talk with other homeschoolers about their experiences with the curriculum.

3. Because writing covers a broad range of topics, some families buy more curriculum than they actually need. This problem can contribute to impulse spending, as some parents fear they won’t do a good job unless they have all their bases covered.

4. Not all homeschool writing curriculum needs to be purchased. Library books can be used for teaching literature, and you can share books with other homeschoolers.

5. Keep your own personality and needs in mind when considering a purchase. Some writing programs, such as those published by Bob Jones University Press, require active planning and participation by parents while other programs, such as Houghton Mifflin English Curriculum, tend to be self-directed and require less parental involvement.

6. Keep your child’s personality and needs in mind as well. A child lacking motivation to write would not be engaged by a traditional homeschool writing curriculum emphasizing grammatical rules and formal language structure. A better option might be a workbook that’s fun and breaks the writing process down into manageable sections.

Many students enjoy the sense of accomplishment they feel when they complete a writing workbook. These positive feelings can carry over into their next writing workbook. You can also supplement any written work with oral assignments.

7. If you don’t like writing, or if you prefer to have everything organized and planned out, consider using a traditional textbook and teacher’s manual. Although this option is more expensive, you’ll benefit from having expert guidance to take you step-by step through each concept.

Teacher’s manuals also assist parents with evaluating their children’s written work. Some include extra printable worksheets and other instructional materials on CDs.

8. Above all else, remember that teachers teach, books don’t. The actual amount of learning that occurs depends largely on the quality of interaction between you and your child.