Beginning the Journey of Homeschooling High School!

Homeschooling high school–are you nervous or excited? Or a little bit of both?! High school is a rewarding time to be homeschooling, as your children mature and grow and engage you in more complicated conversations. Along with the fun, though, are some important things you should be thinking about as you enter these high school years, and now is the time to start work!

Your child’s freshman year is the time to begin learning about high school testing. One of the reasons it is so important to start thinking about this during freshman year is that some tests are best administered to a child immediately after they finish a class. For instance, if they’re taking chemistry and you decide you want them to take an AP test in chemistry, they should take the test when they’ve learned the content.

You also need to decide whether your child should take an SAT, AP, or CLEP subject test. Some colleges only accept certain tests, so it’s important to find out which ones will be accepted by the colleges your child will most likely be going to.

And don’t forget to register for those tests so they can actually take them, because all of the research in the world isn’t going to help you if you don’t actually register for the test! To register, all you have to do is call your local public or private high school and say, “I’m a homeschool parent, and would like to know if my homeschooled child can take the SAT or the AP subject test at your high school, and how do I register for that”?

The next thing you want to do during your child’s freshman year, if you’re feeling pretty confident in where you are, is to think about colleges for a minute. It doesn’t hurt to begin looking at colleges with your teenager now. You could identify a primary list of colleges that you might consider. If you’ve always thought, “probably these four are the ones that we’re going to apply to,” or “my child has always mentioned an interest in going to Harvard” or something, then you should begin to look at those colleges.

If you do have some colleges in mind, it’s a good idea to look into their application requirements now, because if the college your child wants to attend is that one college in a million that requires four years of foreign language or something, you want to know that earlier on in Freshman year. You could also consider a college visit in the spring. Most college visits are done during the spring of Junior year; but it’s perfectly fine for you to take your children for college visits in Freshman year or even earlier.

Venus and Serena Williams – Poster Models For Homeschooling

Venus and Serena Williams are phenomenally successful tennis masters. Their homeschooling background enhances their exceptional professional expression. They are the progeny of their self taught father and coach, Richard Williams.

Lawrence Rudner PhD, led a landmark investigation into the benefits of homeschooling circa 1998-99. In his association with the University of Maryland, he surveyed more than 20000 participants in schooling networks throughout the United States. In this respected study, Rudner revealed the beneficial profile of the home-school genre. His research demonstrated high academic proficiencies of the home-schoolers. He found that the majority of the students showed eighty to ninety percent competencies in their studies at home.

Key to these academic outcomes is the one on one tutorial aspects to instruction. Adventures in Learning k-12 is a in home tutorial approach that includes these successful principles for home-schooling.

The 2007 Rand Corporation study conducted for the US Department of Education re-enforced the findings of the Rudner study. The one on one tutorial-instructional approach leads to higher academic proficiency. So the findings of the 1998 Rudner research are strengthened again in 2007 by the Rand Corporation research for the US Department of Education. Other high achievers like the Williams’ sister include politicians, like Franklin D Roosevelt. Scientists Booker T Washington and George Washington Carver were home schooled. Military leader Douglas MC Arthur also home schooled. Contemporary pop music stars such as the Jonas Brothers and Hansen also were home instructed. Add comedian Whoopi Goldberg to these ranks as well.

Interestingly, the outcomes of successful homeschooling transcends the achievement gaps characteristic of public education. So the results in the Rudner research showed high academic proficiency in all ethnic, racial and economic groupings. Hats off to Richard Williams, the sharecropper’s son, who taught his daughters the art and science of mastery tennis using his own home schooling approach to instruction.

Thinking About Homeschooling? Teachers Are

One might be surprised to know that the biggest influx to the home school arena today are professional teachers. The reasons they give are very interesting.

  •  In the 60s teachers had more say so about what happened in their class rooms. However the government is more in control these days. It is important to know that the Vietnam War taught us that the war cannot be won from the White House. Likewise the teacher, who is in the trenches (metaphorically speaking) knows what her kids need. Unlike the bureaucracy, She sees them as human beings, and not as statistics. Heck the school lunches were even much better in the 60s.
  •  Teachers rightfully complain they must now teach their children to pass the government mandated tests requiring them to sacrifice teaching the basics.
  •  Class sizes have become so large that kids are taught to act like robots rather than individuals. Teachers find themselves having to teach as if a one size fits all…they are less able to individualize their curriculum.
  •  Recess and play time are being decreased. Many teachers complain this is creating stress, and forcing little ones to fit into unhealthy and unnatural molds.

Teachers are getting a bum wrap when they are blamed for the increasing decline in the U.S. public school system, and few people are listening to “those in the trenches”. It is more likely that government bureaucracy is to blame. Is it any wonder that so many teachers are choosing to home school their own families?

Most home school students out perform public school children on college entrance exams. Obviously most parents are doing something right whether they have teaching credentials or not.

Are there some sad stories about children that are not receiving an adequate education in the home school venue? The answer is yes, but there are more such stories found in the public school system. Government intervention is not a solution. Parent awareness and involvement (“those in the trenches”) is the solution. That is the case whether one has children in the home school or public school systems.

This is not said to put an impossible burden or even blame on parents. I say this to empower parents. The solution to today’s education is noticeably coming from you, the people.

Homeschooling Mentoring and Support

Mentoring and support groups are a great way to meet other homeschoolers in your area. They give parents an opportunity to ask questions and get answers from reliable sources. These groups have a variety of different children who are different ages. Therefore, the parents of such children are able to mentor new mothers or fathers in their next step if they need any help. Will and Sue enthusiastically recommended the mentors they and their children had had throughout their homeschooling journey:

When going about on different camps or outings, the other parents really do become mentors to the children and that’s really valuable and is the beginning of a relationship that extends into the children’s lives. Mentoring can be a tremendously important when they go off to study or move away from home, to have these stable adult contacts in their lives year after year, who are interested in their lives. Mentors are there if they need help, advice, wisdom, prayer support or whatever it is. It’s a relationship of trust. Its’ been a support for us and an encouragement for our kids to have these other people. They’re all very different, but they’re all able to contribute in their own way. To have that continuity is special. For instance, we held Jono when he was a baby, and now Jono is married and he has babies of his own.

Veteran homeschool parents in home groups find themselves becoming mentors to new homeschool families. As a new homeschooler, and one that wishes to continue homeschooling without burning out, it is vitally important to become involved in a home group, as these are the basis of training and support in the home. Experienced homeschool parents take a role in educating and initiating new families into the routines of life as a homeschooler. For instance, if parents are not sure what to do for high school, another parent/s in these groups may suggest helpful ideas or explain how they did it. In Canberra, for instance, there is a secular group (Home Education Network Canberra and Southern Tablelands or HENCAST) and a Christian group (Christian Home Education Canberra or CHEC). This is just the beginning of the groups available, especially with the advent of Facebook, Twitter and other social media websites.

Homeschooled children also benefit by the influence of older mentors in their lives. These mentors can often be a generation or two older. They can be grandparents, friends or other homeschooling parents whom the homeschooled children spend time with. When asked if he had any mentors, homeschool student, Ben replied:

Yes, I did, especially when it came to building. I have three or four friends now who are 60 years old and onwards. Some have even passed on now. They taught me heaps and heaps. I spent a lot of time in people’s garages, tinkering away with a bird cage and all kinds of things. The mentors sat and spent their time with me. The grandparents were also pretty good. I spent a lot of time in the shed doing metal work… welding up bits of tractors and things like that as a child. My parents would be inside with the grandmother while I was spending time in the garage with granddad.

Homeschooling magazines and website are also other great and supportive resources. The Home Education Network Otherways Magazine gives parent’s a great opportunity for encouragement and advice in their homeschooling journey. Each issue is delivered quarterly in the mail (or alternately it can be downloaded online). Subscribers can also access all back issues printed. These publications are great for answering the plethora of questions the homeschool mum or dad has, as well as raising other issues close to their heart.

Facebook groups are a great way to ask experienced and fellow homeschooling parent’s questions. For instance, the last three posts in the ‘Homeschool Australia’ forum group I participated in have been:

o Can anyone recommend movies based on historical events? Preferably Australian but not too bothered. – 51 responses

o My 12yr old has totally thrown his sleep cycle out of whack. Today he didn’t go to sleep until 8am. So not much learning is being done because when I’m asleep he is awake and when I am awake he is asleep. How can I fix this? – 27 responses

o Just wondering what outcomes I can meet with a hip hop workshop my 12yr old, year 6 son is doing? It involves composing a beat, adding extra instruments to it, writing a song and performing it. He also does hip hop dancing, aboriginal dancing and learning about the history of rap/hip hop music. – 4 responses

The range of questions, as can be seen, are as wide-ranging and frank as can be. Many parents would discover the answer to their own questions via these forums. This particular group has over 2800 members and is closely monitored by a few administration members who ensure the group stays on topic. Most groups in Australia are closed groups, and require prospective members to tell the administration a little about themselves before they join, in order that vandals or anti-homeschooling activists do not join.

I hope this article has been helpful in giving you a bit of support!

Homeschooling Facebook Groups:

Homeschool Australia

Homeschool Buy Swap and Sell

Homeschooling with Art

Homeschooling with Apps

Homeschooling with Pinterest

Homeschooling with YouTube

Christian Homeschooling Families

Secular Homeschooling Families

And so on…

Homeschooling Methods: From Charlotte Mason to Classical Education

Homeschooling? Unschooling? Charlotte Mason? Waldorf? Part-time? Full-time? The variations within homeschooling can be overwhelming. But don’t worry — it’s not as scary as it first seems.

Consider these common curriculums and educational philosophies used by homeschoolers. This is by no means a comprehensive list, but does cover many major programs and should help you feel more comfortable deciding what kind of homeschooler you are.

Unit Studies

In unit studies, one subject is intensely focused on at a time. This can teach the ability to both compartmentalize and synthesize information. Examples are doing an in-depth study of the presidents of the United States, or spending the month before a vacation to the ocean studying the sea and weather patterns. Unit studies can also use a child’s interests to study a broader subject; for example, studying fashion trends through the ages in order to see how major events in history affected day-to-day living.

Charlotte Mason

The Charlotte Mason method is based on the work of British educator Charlotte Mason. She believed that “education is an atmosphere, a discipline, and a life.” She believed that atmosphere makes up one-third of a child’s education, that cultivating good habits makes up another third, and that children should be taught living, practical ideas rather than dry facts.

Waldorf

Waldorf education aims to educate the whole child, “head, heart, and hands.” Waldorf tries to encourage a genuine love of learning in each child and incorporates arts and activities to create students who are able to create meaning in their lives without external help.

Montessori

The Montessori method focuses on student-directed learning that aims to support a child’s natural way of learning. Montessori involves one-on-one attention and teacher observation and emphasizes all five senses rather than just the visual and auditory senses used in reading, listening, and watching.

Multiple Intelligences

Multiple intelligences education is based on Dr. Howard Gardner’s eight areas of intelligence and learning styles: linguistic, logical-mathematical, spatial, bodily-kinesthetic, musical, interpersonal, intrapersonal, and naturalist. Each individual has strengths in one or more of these intelligences, and the multiple intelligences method involves discovering those strong areas and teaching through them (for example, a student strong in bodily-kinesthetic, or touch-related, knowledge will be most likely to learn by doing, whereas a linguistically-strong child will learn best through reading, writing, and playing with words).

Classical Education

Classical education utilizes three age groups or learning periods, called the “grammar period” (which focuses on the building blocks of education, memorization, and and rules of basic math, phonetics, etc.), the “logic stage” (when cause-and-effect relationships are explored and the child is challenged to ask “Why,” engage in critical thinking, and synthesize ideas), and the “rhetoric stage” (when the student learns to use language to clearly and powerful explain his/her ideas, and begins to focus on areas of knowledge that draw his/her interest; this stage can sometimes involve internships, apprenticeships, college courses, and other forms of higher/specialized education).

Thomas Jefferson Education

Thomas Jefferson Education, also known as “Leadership Education,” also follows three periods: the “foundational phases” (which focus on core values and love of learning), “educational phases” (which teach study skills and discipline; at this stage students engage in a mentor-guided program such as an internship or setting and reaching a personal goal), and “applicational phases” that exist after formal schooling and last the rest of the student’s life (during which the student focuses on contribution to community, and acts as a mentor or community leader). Thomas Jefferson education focuses heavily on love of learning, commitment to values, and seven keys to great teaching.

Accredited Curriculum/Long-Distance/Internet Schooling

This type of homeschool, sometimes referred to as “public school at home” is highly structured and uses state-approved curricula that mirror the curricula being used in public schools. The parent acts as teacher and there is usually a satellite teacher or mentor that the student reports to. Examples include K12.com, LUOnlineAcademy.com, and various university-affiliated high school programs such as Penn Foster High School and BYU Independent Study.

Delayed Schooling

This type of schooling follows the belief that children are not ready for formal schooling until the ages of 7-9. This approach encourages play and natural curiosity in the early years and moves toward more formal learning as the child reaches age 7 (with flexibility depending on the child). This philosophy, though sometimes challenged, is becoming commonly accepted even in some mainstream schools, particularly in the U.K., and is fairly common among unschoolers.

Principle Approach

The Principle Approach to education, which is based on the writing of Rosalie J. Slater and Verna M. Hall, looks at all subjects and information through a Christian worldview. The Bible is used as a major textbook and the student creates notebooks that incorporate both school material and his/her thoughts and meditations. The Principle Approach uses “the 4 Rs,” Research (finding God’s word and identifying religious principles), Reasoning (discovering cause and effect relationships), Relate (applying information to the student), and Record (writing down or otherwise recording the student’s applications and impressions).

Faith-Based

Similar to the Principle Approach but more flexible and not specific to any belief system, faith-based homeschooling incorporates both secular and religious knowledge, and religious beliefs and the family’s values are worked freely into learning and discussions. Though this intermingling is a natural side effect of being homeschooled in a religious household, faith-based education more obviously connects academic knowledge to religion. Spiritual beliefs and experiences are considered as or more important to the child’s education as secular knowledge, and the parent actively seeks to incorporate religious beliefs into the student’s curriculum/educational experience.

Learning Centers

Though not often used full-time as a replacement for public or private school, many homeschoolers find it useful to supplement their curricula with courses and/or tutoring at learning centers such as Kumon, Sylvan, and Huntington. These centers can be especially useful as a student approaches college, as many of them offer ACT and SAT prep courses.

As always, homeschooling is a deeply individual individual matter that should be altered to fit your family. As long as your homeschooling method works for you, keep it, love it, change it as needed, and enjoy the adventure.

Ten Myths About Homeschooling and Anti-Homeschooling Excuses

Prospective homeschool parents have to face fears, doubts and myths that keep them from taking the decision to homeschool their children. This article is an attempt to do some myth-busting, dispel the fears and disqualify the anti-homeschooling excuses that prevent many parents from the awesome experience of homeschooling their families…(yes, not just the kids, the parents get HOME schooled too!)

1. I don’t get on with my kids/ My kids have bad attitudes/ My kids won’t listen to me.

This, to me, is one of the best reasons to homeschool. Instead of running from discipline issues that need to be tackled, loving parents need to embrace opportunities to teach and train their children to be respectful and obedient. They need to learn to reach their children’s hearts, not just apply various methods of behaviour modification and punishment, but actually build heart-to-heart relationships with their children.

Ignoring a problem issue or expecting a teacher to deal with it, does not show love and commitment to children. They will test their boundaries and they need parents to care enough to establish and enforce boundaries. Homeschooling facilitates plenty of opportunities for parent-child relationship-building.

2. I am not well-educated/ I can’t teach subjects like Maths and Science

Research has shown that the level of education of homeschooling parents is not a factor determining successful homeschooling. Even parents that dropped out of high school have successfully homeschooled their children all through high school. Parents who did not have a good school career are often able to fill in the ‘gaps’ in their own education as they progress through various concepts with their children.

Homeschool curricula are designed to be used by parents that are not trained, professionals and for students pursuing self-study. In most cases, clear instructions are given, parent guides and solutions are provided. Some curricula even provide instructional DVD’s where a teacher teaches the new concepts for the benefit of both the parent and the student.

As a last resort, homeschoolers can also do what school-going children do if they battle with a subject – they can go for private tuition.

3. I can’t afford it.

With all the options and choices of curricula available plus free resources available on the internet, there are no grounds for this excuse. Most homeschooling families survive on one income and still give their children a good quality education.

At the very worst, you can limit yourself to spend the same amount as it would cost to have your children attend school, without the extras like school clothing, lunch money, contributions to fund-raising and other school-related expenses.

Since most of your money will be spent on books and materials which can be re-used with younger siblings, you can get a lot of value for your money.

4. My children just LOVE being with their friends

If your children prefer being with their friends, than with their family, perhaps they have already developed an unhealthy peer dependency. This might not seem to be a problem at preschool or primary school level, but just wait until they hit the teen years!

As an alternative, homeschooling enables children to build good relationships with both their parents and their siblings. When their identities are strongly rooted in their families and they have good family values, then children are better able to develop healthy friendships outside the home.

Homeschooling enables parents to choose the social interactions that their children experience. Parents can keep them from negative peer group pressure or bad influences until the children are old enough to gradually be exposed to them and are mature enough to make good decisions and build good relationships.

Homeschoolers don’t just stay at home. They also socialize- just not during school time!

Research has also shown that in general, homeschoolers have better social skills with a wider ranger of age groups than school-going children, whose social interactions are largely limited to their own age group.

5. I don’t have the patience

When I first started homeschooling, I read somewhere that you only get patience if you need it!

The same is true of other character qualities that homeschooling parents need such as perseverance, humility, self-sacrifice, compassion, diligence, etc.

It is through homeschooling that our characters are shaped, moulded and matured and we become equipped to do what we are called to do.

6. I am scared of failing.

I often tell my children that, “Courage is doing what we have to do, EVEN WHEN WE FEEL AFRAID.”

It’s amazing to me how many parents are afraid that they might mess up their children’s education, but they seem to have no fear that some teacher might mess up even better!

When you see how many children suffer for various reasons in the school system, it is even more amazing that parents are willing to entrust their precious blessings to total strangers for 6 hours of the day or more!

As a parent, you love your children like no teacher ever will, you have their best interests at heart and you are able to give them a tailor-made education, suited to their individual needs.

Unless you are not committed to successful homeschooling and dealing with the parenting and discipline issues that may crop up, there is no reason why you should not do an equal or better job than a paid professional.

Now, I am not saying that any parent can be a school teacher – no, I think one does need special training to teach a class of 35 plus children that are not your own in a school situation…but I do believe that committed parents can do a good job in homeschooling their own.

7. Will I cope? I am stressed out already.

Many outsiders see homeschooling only as an added responsibility – the burden of the academic training of their children. However, to give it a different perspective, homeschooling is a lifestyle that brings a lot of flexibility to a family’s day-to-day life. This might be just the thing to help a stressed out parent cope better with the demands of a family.

Since everyone is together, not rushing out in different directions, life is usually simplified. Children are home and can be trained to help out around the house too.

Sometimes a parent may initially need to stop certain outside activities or commitments, like additional church programs, sports or hobbies. However, this is not always the case and many homeschoolers are equally, if not more involved in their communities than non-homeschooling families.

Sometimes these activities just need to be re-scheduled to accommodate the homeschool lifestyle.

Learning to adapt and put family first is often a good thing. I know of too many people whose children are treated like second-rate citizens for the so-called good of the community, so that parents can find approval from their own peer group for their good deeds and commitments!

8. We have such a nice teacher/school.

There certainly are some very nice teachers and schools with good results and good reputations. However, does the teacher or the school’s values match your family values? Will the nice teacher always be the one to teach your child?

Often a school is legally bound to teach a curriculum which may be in conflict with your beliefs. No education is neutral. If you don’t know what your children are being taught, perhaps you should find out the underlying belief system.

No matter how nice the teacher or the school, only YOU have an intimate love relationship with your child and ultimately you are responsible for your child’s education, whether you delegate that responsibility to a school or not.

9. I need more stimulation/ I can’t just stay home / I love my job.

As career-workers, many of us initially find our identity in our job, satisfaction in the approval from our co-workers, boss or simply the pay check at the end of the month.

Choosing to stay home as a wife and mother demands a shift in one’s mindset and accepting that at the end of many days and months there is no tangible reward. You come to realize that raising well-educated, confident and secure children is one of the greatest achievements that one can strive towards. For many of us, its obedience to a God-given calling.

Although the stimulation may be of a different kind to that of a job, homeschooling can be very stimulating for parents as it offers you the opportunity to learn and explore topics of interest along with your children. It affords you the time to enjoy educational trips, tours, outings, co-ops, crafts, hobbies, sport and even home-based business opportunities.

(Many homeschooling parents, like me have website-based businesses that earn them a good income and they get to work at their own pace! See links below.)

10. My parents, in-laws, friends, neighbours or church, etc. won’t approve.

For some reason, we all like to have the approval of others, especially those whom we respect and with whom we have intimate relationships. However, if you and your spouse are in agreement that homeschooling is best for your children, you need to have the guts to stand up for your convictions.

To many non-homeschoolers, homeschooling is a foreign concept and people don’t understand why you are NOT just doing the done thing and sending your children to school.

Sometimes people feel that by your choice to homeschool, you are silently judging their choice of schooling and rating it as second best, so they attack your choice because attack is their best defence.

Ultimately, you are responsible for your children, not your family and peers…and a good answer is to tell others that you feel your choice is best for YOUR family but you realize it may not be the same for other families. You don’t even have to explain your reasons!

Many homeschoolers have had to face criticism and skepticism from outsiders, yet in the end, the ‘proof has been in the pudding’ as they say. Many times, after a few years, others have seen the good fruit of a homeschooling family and they have earned the respect and support which was lacking at first!

Three Benefits Of Homeschooling Your Children

Are you reluctant of enrolling your child into a public school because you have heard of bad stories and reports of what the kids there go through? How about giving your child an education from your home? In this article I will list three benefits of homeschooling your children. Keep reading to learn more!

Benefits Of Homeschooling – You Protect Your Child From Negative Exposure

When your child learns from home, you are able to protect your child from a lot of negative exposure that children usually go through in the public school systems. Research has shown us that a lot of violence can happen in public schools. Fights can break out there. Not only that, but there is a lot of peer pressure and many kids end up picking up bad habits such as joining gangs, dealing drugs, smoking weed and more. If you homeschool your child, he or she will not be exposed to such environments. Now besides all the negative peer influences, the public education system may sometimes be detrimental to the students. I will elaborate on how that is so in the next paragraph.

Benefits Of Homeschooling – Your Have More Control Over Your Child’s Learning Process

When your child takes lessons from home, you control how your child learns, and what he or she learns. The public education system can be quite rigid in that it does not pick out each student’s preferred way of learning, and hence, not all students will be able to learn well or score well in their examination. You need to know that different children have different preferred learning styles, and it is important that you know your child’s preferred learning style. Some children learn better through getting hands on experience, others can pick up concepts through auditory learning, and there are still others who learn better visually. Find out how your child learns better and tweak your homeschooling curriculum to suit that learning style.

Benefits Of Homeschooling – Your Children Could Grow Up To Be Better Than Those Who Went To Public School

Scientific research has also shown that children who have been homeschooled grow up to be more street-smart than those who graduated from public school. Maybe this is because the students in public school are more focused on getting good results that they are more logical and theoretical, whereas those who were homeschooled enjoyed their learning process and were able to spend more time with their parents while they were growing up.

I hope you have been convinced by these benefits of homeschooling. Do take some time to think through what you have read today.

Homeschooling Pros and Cons – Learn About the Pros and Cons

Making a choice about your child’s schooling takes a lot of thinking and consideration. You need to decide what is the absolute best decision for your child. I hope that the following information about homeschooling will help to guide you in your decision making.

Homeschooling pros:

You decide what your child learns, and when they learn it. This is, I believe, the biggest pro for homeschooling. You decide whether you want your child to learn evolution or creation, Christianity or Islam or no religion, all of the choices are left up to you!

You learn along with you child. You and your child will grow closer to each other as you learn together, and spend practically all day every day together.

In addition to this your child will have your undivided attention compared to being in a classroom with thirty other students.

Homeschooling cons:

Your child will not have the same social life that they would have if they went to a different school. This is, I believe, the biggest con for homeschooling. Your child will not be as comfortable around people other than their family, because they will not be hanging out with other people on a regular basis.

You will need to make a big time commitment. You will be dedicating many hours each day to teaching your child, and therefore will not have as much time left for other things.

No matter what decision you end up making, I hope that you will give this important decision an incredible amount of thought.

Benefits of Homeschooling

A wise man once said, “We can teach our children to have courage, faith, and endurance and show them how to learn, and they can teach us to laugh, to sing, and to love.” In other words, each family member has valuable lessons to teach the family.

When a family homeschools, this reciprocal relationship is magnified. Homeschooling participants are affected by more than just the person who sit at the homeschool table. All generations create and reinforce the bond between family members. Home schooling families spend their time laughing, learning, playing and living with each other 24/7.

You can choose the best curriculum to promote an intrinsic love of lifelong learning. The homeschool curriculum is flexible. The parameters are determined by the best teachers available, the parents, who know and love their children.

Learning never stops in the homeschool environment. The parents are not just lecturers or observers. They are active participants who expand, explain and encourage their children to be inquisitive and explore the specific areas that interest them without the constraints of arbitrary rules set up by an outside source.

Another benefit to homeschooling is that the parents model and reinforce valuable behavior and deemphasize undesirable behavior in a natural manner.

Historically several generations lived in the same home. Everyone benefited from this multi-generational living arrangement, coming away with valuable lessons that cannot be taught in a book. Plus most of the time there was the added advantage of the multi-grade/level schoolhouse for the formal education.

Presently we often put the older generation in nursing homes when they get too bothersome (only to visit them on holidays), and we settle for a failing public school system that has been tasked with being everything to everyone but alienates most participants.

Homeschooling is the best of both worlds. It’s good for both the family and for your children’s education.

The benefits of home schooling are limitless. As a parent who homeschooled three children, I feel that homeschooling is the greatest gift a parent can give their child. Try it. You’ll like it!

The Power of Homeschooling

There are 3 powerful reasons why homeschooling works. These include:

(1.) Homeschooling enables exposure to a broad range of people, ideas, and places. Homeschooling is so flexible that it allows family field trips whenever you want. This provides a great way to learn through taking tours, meeting knowledgeable people, and volunteering. What is even better is that you can take advantage of these opportunities during the week when there aren’t crowds and when the tour guides, or educators, have time to answer your individual questions. Add in some library books and videos, the writing of thank you notes, the writing of a portfolio entry describing your “adventure,” and the possibility of giving an oral presentation to other homeschoolers and you’ll see just how powerful this can truly be. This also teaches your child(ren) that there are great teachers to be found in every walk of life.

(2.) If you own your own home business, homeschooling provides opportunities to teach your child(ren) business skills. Starting a home business today is relatively easy and painless. Involving your child(ren) in your home business is an excellent opportunity to teach them skills which will serve them well in any livelihood they might choose as adults. Just think of the various business opportunities that avail themselves. For instance, you can teach your child(ren) how to do basic bookkeeping on the computer.

(3.) Homeschooling allows great flexibility for vacations. You can easily take vacations in the off-season when prices are significantly lower and crowds are rare. For instance, if your family enjoys camping, you can go during the week, or in the weeks before Memorial Day and after Labor Day.

As you can easily see, homeschooling allows a family to do so much of what they truly love to do. That is the greatest power of homeschooling.